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Who Are You Korean Drama Recap

Korean tvN Drama Misaeng Episode 13 Recap
Korean Tvn Drama Misaeng Episode 13 Recap

Korean tvN Drama Misaeng Episode 13 Recap

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This was Baek-ki’s episode, as we saw him climb slowly back up from his low point. My heart broke a little when he couldn’t get himself to ask to get drinks with his boss or call anyone else out. He needed a wake-up call (literally, in this episode), but I wish he could open up to his newbie colleagues to share his inner struggles. He’s so by the book and prides himself in his competence, but he’s his biggest critic. Being his perfectionist self, he’s always so full of anxiety and ambition to make sure he’ll succeed. And he doesn’t want to show any sign of weakness to his colleagues, who he assumes are way ahead of him. I love how he finally got to let out his worries through a hilarious turn of events that led him to grab a beer with his senior. It was like the universe giving him this one last opportunity to make it happen, just through the most awkward way possible.

Geu-rae articulates his epiphany quite well, with the metaphor of being drunk. He was lost in a state of indifference for so long because he had lost that passion, that ability to become drunk. He convinced himself that he was no longer committed to baduk, and that state of soberness had quickly turned into cynicism and loneliness. We don’t want to promote perpetual drunkenness or alcoholism here, but I can see how soberness can be detrimental in this context. Without this drunken state, you lose drive, motivation, and any will to do anything. He may be drunk on work now, but you could make the case that he’s still drunk on baduk — the game that allows him to be so passionate about work and life in general.

I love how the newbies are starting to find solace in each other through turbulent times. They’ve started to hear each other out, give each other advice, and give unwanted congratulatory hugs. I’m loving the camaraderie from this group, and I’m hoping these reluctant friends will soon become definite homies.

Korean KBS2 Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 15 Recap
Korean Kbs2 Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 15 Recap

Korean KBS2 Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 15 Recap

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Yoon-hoo accuses Yoo-jin of hurting himself more than anybody else, but as Streseman notes, Yoon-hoo’s thinking is still stuck in a mode that prevents his progress. Namely, he thinks pessimistically, of cutting his losses rather than bringing everyone up. There’s a “it’s not worth it” bent to his attitude, which explains his defeated response to the latest setback. So it’s completely in character for the scrappy S Orchestra members to not just pick themselves up, but to also not even consider defeat as their end. They have a fundamentally different way of approaching the problem—it’s a starting point, not the end—and I think it’s fair to credit Yoo-jin for harboring that attitude in them. Which is why it’s nice to see that when the orchestra makes their silent appeal to the board, they’ve won over the A Orchestra members to their side, rather than the reverse.

I loved the orchestra’s show of solidarity, even if they weren’t actively arguing or pleading their case or doing something. Their spirit of unity was sincere and loud enough to move the board members—plus, it takes the question of their future away from whether they “deserve” to have an orchestra or whether they’ve “lost” the privilege due to their media snafu, and instead to what the orchestra gives them. The board members recognize that the orchestra provides these students with lessons and experiences that enrich their lives, and that has value. It’s lovely to see that kind of message come through.

Korean SBS Drama Pinocchio Episode 5 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Sbs Drama Pinocchio Episode 5 Recap And Screenshots

Korean SBS Drama Pinocchio Episode 5 Recap and Screenshots

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I find Hyung a little underdeveloped, since he didn’t seem like a killer at all before this, which was obviously in service of the surprise. I wish his darker side had been given a little more attention, because up until now he’s seemed trusting and kind, and I was so looking forward to their reunion. Plotwise, the twist is great, since it sets Dal-po up for a future moral quandary that he’s never had to consider before. He’s always been on the side of the wronged innocent party, but if Hyung continues down this path, he’ll be at odds with the very reason he wanted to become a reporter. It’s tragic, but I do like the mechanism by which the two brothers end up on opposite sides, because it’s instigated by the same event—they each find out that Dad really died, and through that Dal-po gains hope that he isn’t all alone in the world, while Hyung loses his last ounce of hope and believes he’s truly alone. That’s the point at which the road forks for them, and the contrast is made even starker when we see Dal-po being so loved by his adopted family.

The trio of medicine packets pinched my heart, and what’s so nice about the setup is that the heartwarming family moments now serve double duty, to make us happy and then to also ratchet up the romantic angst. It’s almost worse that they’re so good to Dal-po, because this way he can never act on his feelings, and he has to keep burying them even in the face of In-ha’s confession. She has no idea that her declaration just made his burden to keep his distance a thousand times harder, but that’s the kind of angst that hurts in a good way, and it killed me when he smiled wistfully and said that it must be nice to be able to shake off those feelings so easily.

What I love about their relationship is that the truth can be said on In-ha’s part—and it has to, eventually, given her hiccups—but knowing the truth only adds to the complications. It’s the very opposite of the kind of drama conflict I hate, where the telling of one secret would un-complicate everything (because where’s the creativity in that?). Obviously Dal-po plays everything pretty close to the vest, but we’re not holding back on revealing things between characters because there’s plenty of conflict even with the truth exposed. In-ha confessing her feelings makes it even harder for Dal-po to get over her, and Dal-po telling Gyo-dong who he really is makes him better for the job (He’s passionate about the truth!), and worse (Hello, loose cannon, twelve o’clock!). And now that In-ha is part of MSC and quite literally in the enemy camp, will Dal-po’s fears about seeing her as her mother come true?

Korean TVN Drama Misaeng Episode 12 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Tvn Drama Misaeng Episode 12 Recap And Screenshots

Korean TVN Drama Misaeng Episode 12 Recap and Screenshots

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I feel like I ought to be more nervous about this presentation, because if Geu-rae is questioning himself, then it must be something really radical. But Sales Team 3 has taught me these past few episodes to have utmost faith in them, especially when Chief Oh decides to follow his gut instead of protocol. That’s not to say everything will end up being perfect for them, but history has shown that by fighting their way through based on integrity and the desire to do the job to their best of their ability, they often manage to succeed in the end. It’s about winning the war, not the individual battle. Even if this Jordan used-car project does seem to be the hill Chief Oh is willing to die on.

Dong-shik has been one of my favorite characters since that first day he willingly decided to help Geu-rae navigate office life, and throughout the show he’s remained one of my favorites. But this episode cements the reason why I love him so him so much — he’s a steady and loyal employee. He perfectly balances out the exuberantly dynamic Chief Oh by calmly getting his work done, even when he may not initially agree with it. That’s not to say he’s afraid of speaking his mind — he voices his concerns, even as he accepts that he’s willing to follow Chief Oh’s lead.

I wonder how many times he’s been told he should try to transfer out of Team Sales 3, since I think it’s been told to him at least a few times just since Geu-rae joined the team. Yet he believes in his team, and he believes in Chief Oh, and is willing to stand up and fight for those beliefs. Perhaps even literally, considering how it was only Chief Jung’s accusation that Chief Oh had no business ethics that finally got a reaction out of Dong-shik. He’s the center of our little misfit team, and I’m pretty sure they would be lost without him — especially Geu-rae, since I’m happy to see this little friendship/mentorship continue to bloom.

Korean Drama
Korean Drama "misaeng" Episode 11 Recap

Korean Drama "Misaeng" Episode 11 Recap

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Sales Team 3 is back into their daily grind of work, with the now Deputy Director Oh (but we’ll just keep calling him Chief Oh) who’s still meticulous as ever. Geu-rae narrates that the team’s silent dedication to work is due to the unfortunate case with Chief Park — it was not a success to be celebrated. “We didn’t feel a difference within our team, but we could feel the difference in the gazes directed at us. We had taken out a sluggard from our team and a saved the company from a drawback. But we were given uncomfortable looks because others questioned if we had benefitted at the cost of a team member.”

As Sales Team 3 walks through the office for their meeting, all the office workers stare at them. The office members had become sympathetic towards those who had resigned due to this incident, but no one disputed the fact that someone had to take responsibility.

Korean Drama 'Cantabile Tomorrow' Episode 13 Recap
Korean Drama 'cantabile Tomorrow' Episode 13 Recap

Korean Drama 'Cantabile Tomorrow' Episode 13 Recap

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Yoo-jin is taken aback by the proposal, but Streseman asks directly if he isn’t going to go abroad—does he plan to keep conducting the Rising Stars even after he graduates? He points out that Nae-il gets to study in Europe if she places first in the competition, and asks if that had anything to do with Yoo-jin encouraging her to compete. And if so, is he really not going to go with her? I don’t suppose any of this is news to Yoo-jin, who seems like he’s consciously aware of his motivations, but it’s hard to shy away when it’s stated so plainly like this.

Il-lac feels dejected over the way the orchestra vote went down, but Shi-won assures him that he deserves this solo and can do a good job. She’s sweet in the supportive (almost?) girlfriend role, though in this case it may be even more meaningful to throw her support to him as concertmaster, and she tells him to do a good job.

Korean Drama Pinocchio Episode 4 Recap
Korean Drama Pinocchio Episode 4 Recap

Korean Drama Pinocchio Episode 4 Recap

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As they head back down with her suitcase full of books, In-ha offers to give Dal-po her precious notes that she spent three years compiling. She worries about Grandpa finding out that Dal-po isn’t dumb, but he’s not concerned at all, since he plans to keep his cabbie job and just study intermittently because he’s positive he won’t be hired. Ah, okay, this helps me understand your whim a little better. He says there’s a zero-percent chance that a taxi driver will get hired as a reporter, and she corrects him that their chances are the same: fifty-fifty, pass or fail. For her sake, he agrees.

At home, Grandpa helps them put her books back, and In-ha’s already on edge just dreading the inevitable blowup with Dad over her breaking their contract. Grandpa wisely tells them that there’s no forcing someone to think your thoughts, parents and children alike.

Korean Drama King's Face Episode 1 Recap
Korean Drama King's Face Episode 1 Recap

Korean Drama King's Face Episode 1 Recap

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Rewind to the year 1589, the twenty-second year of King Seonjo’s reign. He wakes from a nightmare/memory of his childhood, where the court’s face reader had foretold that he would bring disaster to the nation if he were to become king, citing his unsuitable features and the Yongahn Biseo, the secret book of physiognomy that’s been handed down since Joseon was founded.

But when the ailing king suddenly died—leaving Seonjo was next in line for the throne—the face reader wielded a sword on the then-prince Seonjo, prepared to kill him for the good of the country.

In the present, King Seonjo is taken to a village suffering from an outbreak of the plague. Those who aren’t burning in mass graves are vomiting blood, but Seonjo surprises his attendants when he takes the hand of a man who collapses at his feet.

Korean Drama Bad Guys Episode 8 Recap
Korean Drama Bad Guys Episode 8 Recap

Korean Drama Bad Guys Episode 8 Recap

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In any case, Prosecutor Oh is pretty confident that knowing who issued the kill order on Jung-moon will ultimately result in Team Crazy Dog’s dissolution. Tae-soo admits that he also received an order to kill Jung-moon when they were imprisoned together two years ago. Although he doesn’t know who instigated the operation, he points Mi-young in the right direction.

Mi-young is in no mood to deal with unanswered questions from the elderly baduk player, flicking his book away to let him know that she means business. She reports back to Prosecutor Oh of what she’s told: that the man was one of the Hwayeondong victim’s fathers who wanted Jung-moon dead.

Korean TVN Drama Liar Game Episode 10 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Tvn Drama Liar Game Episode 10 Recap And Screenshots

Korean TVN Drama Liar Game Episode 10 Recap and Screenshots

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I know that Woo-jin’s involvement in L Company’s fall will be explored in the show’s final week (*sob*) and that it may be hard for Da-jung to think through this issue rationally for a while, but I do hope she gives it a very good shot. Because while I see how this can be a damning reveal—especially in the way Da-jung heard about it—I don’t want the blame game to be drowned in a puddle of tears next week. Woo-jin did a bad thing in razing a company and probably ruined a whole lot of lives, true, but him being unintentionally and tangentially responsible for Dad’s debt when he wasn’t even using his own money butborrowed money to invest isn’t the same as Woo-jin holding a smoking gun over the corpse of Da-jung’s father. Or so I hope, because if I needed my smelling salts after Woo-jin called her “Da-jung-ah,” just think of the damage a whole scene could do.

Watching Do-young give into his insanity was more frightening than I thought it’d be, though I realized somewhere along the way that the reason I felt so unsettled during his mad scenes was because I actually care about what happens to him. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not like I’m advocating forgiveness or reconciliation for him, only that he’s not the kind of villain I can view through a dispassionate and detached lens. I actually can’t quite figure out what it is, only that I felt a twinge in my chest when Do-young started to panic with the invalid bank cards. It was something-like-but-not-necessarily pity, which came on unannounced because Do-young does NOT deserve it.

And yet I felt it. I don’t know what that says about me, only that there’s something sad about the idea that Do-young was once a normal child who endured something sinister. Just how sinister is yet to be revealed, though the pieces of the puzzle are starting to form a coherent picture. If Woo-jin’s mother had something to do with Do-young’s stolen childhood, and if everything up to this moment has been an act of very, very elaborate revenge on Do-young’s part, then I’ll have to prepare my mind before it gets blown to smithereens next week. In the meantime, R.I.P. Sung-joon. Yours was the kind of death that will live on forever in our nightmares. *pours one out*