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Korean tvN Drama Misaeng Episode 10 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Tvn Drama Misaeng Episode 10 Recap And Screenshots

Korean tvN Drama Misaeng Episode 10 Recap and Screenshots

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That’s not to say I like him — nope, he’s still got a long way to go. But I can see that he’s starting to appreciate (and even respect) Young-yi’s skills and work-ethic. Even though the trip to the chemical factory didn’t end as well as she hoped, I’m fairly certain he sent her away just so she could stop being the department’s glorified maid. He may not have handled it smoothly, but from the small ways he reacts to his surroundings, I do believe he feels some shame for the way he’s treated her, even if he’s too proud to admit it. I’m still waiting for him to really apologize and work hard to make amends — but I’m not going to hold my breath. After all, this show can definitely change our minds about certain characters, but it still doesn’t pretend anyone will suddenly become a saint overnight.

It definitely seems easier to slip down the “darker” path, as evidenced by Chief Park. In the flashback, he seemed like your standard salaryman, but his pride and ego at winning a huge contract — and then not getting the recognition (or reward) that he thought he deserved — meant he was willing to go down that slippery slope of making his own compensation. I’m not sure if the sexual harassment is a by-product of his new-found “forget you, I’m going to get mine” attitude, but it definitely cements him as one of those crush-anyone-to-remain-on-top employees. Unfortunately, it didn’t work out so well for him in the end.

I have to wonder if he would have gotten away with it if he had been assigned to any team but Sales Team 3. The show keeps pointing out that Chief Oh can’t move up the ladder because he cares too much about doing a job correctly than getting it done in a snazzy manner that will attract the attention of the higher ups. It almost seems like Manager Kim was asking Chief Park to get caught, except that doesn’t make sense since it looks like Manager Kim will be facing his own punishment as the one who originally signed off on the Jordan used-car project. (A project that makes me wonder if that’s the reason for the opening scene in the first episode.)

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Korean Drama "pinocchio" Episode 3 Recap

Korean Drama "Pinocchio" Episode 3 Recap

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Ha Myung (Dal Po) pinches his dad’s cheek, wanting to know if this is a dream? His family asks him what is he talking about- did he dream, what about? Ha Myung replies, “A bad dream,” and describes briefly what happened. His family calls him crazy and his mom hits his father for doing something bad in Ha Myung’s dream. He is just about to believe all those horrible memories of his father running away and his mother dying was just a bad dream whe he felt his mother’s warm hand on his face, but then he sees In Ha, calling him uncle. His family asks like nothing is wrong and his brother is calling In Ha his niece too. Ha Myung realizes it is a dream, but he doesn’t want to wake up. But wait! The tablecloth feels so real. This has to be real!

But it is not. It is October 2013 and the Choi family has moved to Seoul since the last time we saw them. Dal Po is definitely dreaming and he is rubbing the cloth of In Ha’s skirt that feels very similar to the tablecloth in his dream. He rubs her skirt a little too hard and a little too close, earning him a punch in the face and an exclamation of “pervert!”

Korean tvN drama Misaeng Episode 9 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Tvn Drama Misaeng Episode 9 Recap And Screenshots

Korean tvN drama Misaeng Episode 9 Recap and Screenshots

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I love that baduk is that one constant that guides Geu-rae throughout his experiences in the “real world,” and I especially loved Geu-rae’s connection with Dong-shik in this episode. Dong-shik hit the nail on the head with his analysis of Geu-rae. He’ll do anything and everything to adjust to society because he blames himself for everything that’s ever happened to him. He walks the fine line of self-deprecation and self-pity, making him the ultimate underdog. But a quick glance into his baduk-strategy mind shows us that he’s no underdog. He finds significant parallels between work and baduk that sets him way ahead of the game. It’s his mindset and extreme patience that allow him to advance, even if he lacks the skills and savvy of his peers. His life is dictated by his baduk manual, and I appreciate how the concepts of baduk don’t exclusively apply to Geu-rae. The baduk analogy about finding a place for yourself applies to all of them, no matter what skill level they’re at. If baduk really makes you this good at life, I’d better learn how to play.

I want to commend Baek-ki for finally coming to the realization about his skill level and accepting it. I could imagine how crushing it would be to realize that you really don’t know what you’re doing. He had to swallow his pride and put away his stubborn self, and that requires a certain level of maturity, which Seok-yul may still be lacking. Baek-ki’s ambition and confidence got to his head, so I’m glad he got a good reminder that basics precede any desire to succeed. Instant gratification is not a characteristic of salaryman life, and Baek-ki finally drilled this into his head. Good thing Newbie Guardian Angel and Super Salaryman was around to guide him through his crisis. As much as I loved the different focuses on our newbies, we were missing out on some Chief Oh action. But from that ending, we’ve got a lot of Chief Oh coming up. Huzzah!

Korean OCN Drama Bad Guy Episode 7 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Ocn Drama Bad Guy Episode 7 Recap And Screenshots

Korean OCN Drama Bad Guy Episode 7 Recap and Screenshots

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I’m of the belief that a good story should (and would) be able to introduce and inject enough life into its characters and establish their relationships with each other within minutes or an hour. And for what it’s worth Tae-soo and Jong-seok certainly falls into this category. We’d heard about Jong-seok either in passing or with sparse glimpses, but when you put Tae-soo and Jong-seok in the same scene, you could feel the acrimonious relationship burning within and between them. The fight scene at the docks spoke volumes about who they were and who they are now, and Tae-soo’s speech about why he can’t bring himself to kill anymore speaks to how he can wash off the blood from his hands, but not the blood that haunts him in his mind. Pair that with the brief glimpses into their past together, and the sorrow that Tae-soo feels is palpable and heart-wrenching. You never know how precious someone is to you until you lose him.

Korean tvN Drama Liar Game Episode 8 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Tvn Drama Liar Game Episode 8 Recap And Screenshots

Korean tvN Drama Liar Game Episode 8 Recap and Screenshots

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And that’s the sort of thing you don’t want to hear when your archenemy is literally an evil mastermind who knows more about how people work than you do. We’d had our suspicions about how Do-young could fool Woo-jin’s internal and unfailing (at least until now) lie detector, and while we knew Do-young’s motivations were sinister and strange, this latest reveal just took things to a whole new level. Because now we know that the greatest villain dramaland has ever seen is conducting a sinister social experiment based (possibly) on a childhood spent wearing a mask as part of someone else’s sinister social experiment. Best origin story ever, or greatest origin story ever? I can’t decide.

Korean SBS Drama Pinocchio Episode 2 Recap and Screencaps
Korean Sbs Drama Pinocchio Episode 2 Recap And Screencaps

Korean SBS Drama Pinocchio Episode 2 Recap and Screencaps

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The one thing that made me look forward to their young adult years after high school was Dal-po’s scene with former reporter Gyo-dong. We all suspected that Gyo-dong would be our principled reporter based on his trajectory in the first episode, but I’m glad to know it’s true. He wasn’t very different from Cha-ok five years ago, when he was arguing for the same things that she was, and only had a more principled boss to stop him. But what’s important is how that event with Dal-po’s family changed him, and what he learned about his profession and the power of his voice. I’m curious to learn why he’s the PD of a quiz show now instead of a news reporter, and overall the Dal-po/Gyo-dong matchup is the one thing that doesn’t make me sad about leaving the high school years eventually. Well that and the possibility of Dal-po reuniting with Hyung, but I feel like they’re going to tease that for close to an eternity.

What got me about the central romance was how their feelings grew out of a genuine bond, because no matter how much they pretend outwardly to hate each other, they’re family and they look out for each other. I can’t believe Dal-po got such horrific grades all this time just to keep Grandpa in good health, but then it’s just as cute that after all that, he can’t let it go when the other kid might win In-ha’s heart. I do want to see him be more conflicted about his feelings, but I’m sure that angst is well on its way. For now their mutual feelings (and inability to confess, of course) is enough to get me onboard, especially when he looks at her like she’s the cutest thing he’s ever laid eyes on.

Korean KBS Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 10 Recap and Screencaps
Korean Kbs Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 10 Recap And Screencaps

Korean KBS Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 10 Recap and Screencaps

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Nae-il arrives outside Yoo-jin’s door and has to calm herself down from the excitement, telling herself that it’s “only food.” There’s no answer and she can’t let herself in because he changed his door code, which makes her wistful for the days when they had the same code and it felt like they were spouses living in the same space. But wouldn’tcha know, the old number she punches in idly actually opens the door, because Yoo-jin the huge marshmallow (in armadillo disguise) changed it back.

Inside, Nae-il finds all her old things back where she’d left them, and we see that Yoo-jin had gone around putting her belongings back in their places. Ah, so that’s what he meant last time when he tried to explain what he’d done with her things and she assumed he’d thrown them out. Of course Yoo-jin downplays this now, but Nae-il knows what’s up, and that’s what I care about.

Korean tvN drama Misaeng Episode 8 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Tvn Drama Misaeng Episode 8 Recap And Screenshots

Korean tvN drama Misaeng Episode 8 Recap and Screenshots

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The department head isn’t yelling in anger, though — he just received a phone call that CEO Moon approved the deal, and actually asked to double the agreement. Dong-shik is amazed, surprised to learn that CEO Moon is such a romantic, assuming he was swayed by the opportunity to spend his anniversary with his wife. But as Geu-rae cleans up the research on CEO Moon that was left on Chief Oh’s desk, he finds out the truth: Chief Oh had discovered that it’s the CEO’s wife who’s actually in charge of the company.

The next day, Geu-rae — and Assistant Manger Kang — see Baek-ki in the middle of a meeting with his head-hunter. Chief Oh is just excited to get to the office because, as promised, a new employee has been assigned to their team. Aw, he’s still hoping for Young-yi.

When they arrive at their desks, the new guy is already there. He greets Chief Oh by name, but Chief Oh stands stone-faced, his previous good cheer completely gone.

Korean SBS Drama Secret Door Episode 15 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Sbs Drama Secret Door Episode 15 Recap And Screenshots

Korean SBS Drama Secret Door Episode 15 Recap and Screenshots

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It’s too bad that I don’t feel the same level of emotional investment in Sun’s relationship with Ji-dam/Bingae, because I still see her the way Sun describes in this episode—as one of his people, whom he failed to protect. She holds significant meaning in that regard, but their relationship doesn’t stir my heart, at least not yet. There’s potential for that to change, but by now I’m so invested in Hyegyeong that it might hurt too much. I was so impressed by Hyegyeong’s response to Sun that she disapproves of basically everything he’s doing as a man; but as a future king, she respects him. It’s her sacrifice to give up her disappointment as a wife in order to support him as a queen, and I’m SO glad that this time Sun sees it clearly, and that she isn’t hiding behind her pride. It’s all the more reason I don’t want to see him break her heart. I know it seems inevitable, but hey, aren’t we rewriting history here?

Korean KBS2 Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 9 Recap and Screenshots
Korean Kbs2 Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 9 Recap And Screenshots

Korean KBS2 Drama Cantabile Tomorrow Episode 9 Recap and Screenshots

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I feel like the drama perhaps spent too much time building up the politics behind the orchestra deathmatch, but now that we’re here I do like where it’s taking us. (I’d argue that the drama could have kept the episodes structured with the same key plot beats but cut down on the faculty and Teacher Do scenes, which would have made it just as effective and more fun.) I can see where it feels a little dramatic to have such big drama devoted to the question of which orchestra remains, but I also think the angst makes sense to me from the students’ perspective. An orchestra is a complicated enough organization that you can’t just whip one up out of nowhere, and if a school only allows for one, there’s little motivation to pour yourself into a renegade orchestra that gives you no credits (or performance opportunities or recognition).

So the S Orchestra feels particularly lost because these are musicians who wouldn’t have gotten into an orchestra the conventional way, who’ve discovered this new joy, and now are having it snatched away because of politics. The A Orchestra kids have earned their spots, but Yoo-jin has a point in saying that there’s a difference when your membership is primarily doing it for the resumé boost. He wants skill and musicality and passion, not just one or the other; hence the new orchestra, which embodies his and Streseman’s vision of taking the best of both worlds.