"The Prime Minister and I" Episode 17 Final

I've been thinking ever since Na-yeong came back that it seems like the drama's writers aren't doing much with her. It's only this episode that I realized in some sense there's not much for Na-yeong to do. Her brother and his wife are glad to have her back. But an adult sibling doesn't rely on or need a sister as much as a man and his kids need their wife and mother. The question of abandonment is a strong one, and I could see here how the survivors ended up feeling ambivalent.

Mind, it took a bit of squinting to get there. "The Prime Minister and I" doesn't deal much with this issue directly. We don't even get to see what Na-yeong is doing in the afterword. Once more the focus is on the relationship between Kwon Yool and Da-jeong, and whether they will or will not continue seeing each other. The answer is...kind of ambiguous. It makes use of all the plot devices seen so far and sets everything up reasonably logically, but there's not that much punch to it.

Most of the emotion here comes from the hospital scenes, where we find one character to be on their last legs. I liked this denouement- it had a good emotional impact. Unfortunately I realized that even though we've been spending lots of time in the hospital lately, it really hasn't been much of a focus for this drama at all throughout the entire middle of the drama's run, which was dominated by romance and spy antics.

Ultimately the introduction of Na-yeong into the storyline derailed a lot of this, such that in many ways the ending of "The Prime Minister and I" is a completely different drama than the zany episodes that preceded it- a fact made all too clear in the wistful flashbacks we see, which depicted a drama with a much wackier sense of humor and a lot less brooding. It's kind of weird to watch this episode and see resolutions to subplots which for the most part didn't even exist.

As an ending, I guess this is all right. I can't imagine it will make anyone angry, but it's really more of a case of lost potential. From a rational perspective, everyone is playing it safe and making mature adult decisions on how to proceed. That's probably and easy position to take when one care has destroyed her life by going into hiding for no reason. Still, it might be a bit of a lesson as to why many dramas resort to outrageousness to grab viewer attention. While I can appreciate where these characters are coming from, this alone does not make them that interesting to watch.

Review by William Schwartz

"The Prime Minister and I" is directed by Lee So-yeon-I and written by Kim Eun-hee and Yoon Eun-kyeong and features Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon and Chae Jeong-an

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"The Prime Minister and I" Episode 15

The trouble with having a climax that's about people realizing their revenge schemes were a dumb idea is that...well...there's not really much of an exciting climax. All the potentially exciting dangerous plot stuff is what the bad guys are now trying to cancel, and for the most part they're succeeding. It's honestly kind of comical watching so many cast members working so frantically to prevent anything from happening.

The exception to this is Kwon Yool, who remains blissfully unaware of anything that's going on. I have to wonder how he became prime minister in the first place, really. Surely the man has some political allies somewhere. Or maybe that's how he got elected. I can easily see this drama's version of Korean politics being a place where most elected officials try to shirk actual responsibilities so they can play spy games with each other instead.

But enough discussion of all the things that we aren't seeing in "The Prime Minister and I". This episode continues with the soft character exploration of the last, demonstrating how thanks to Na-jeong, Kwon Yool and his family are in a much better place emotionally than they were still recovering from his wife's apparent death. Na-yeong's timing in all this remains unclear, as most chances she gets to explain herself, Na-yeong instead chooses to run away.

From a narrative perspective there are two things Na-yeong's appearance accomplishes. In the first place the mere fact that she's still alive is enough to scuttle the schemes against Kwon Yool. So that's one plot thread resolved. In the second place though, Na-yeong's presence directly threatens Na-jeong's status as wife and surrogate mother. It's clear that Na-jeong thinks Na-yeong needs to reunite with her family- but as of yet, Na-yeong is still resisting and it's not clear what her plan is, or even if there is one.

All right, am I the only one that's annoyed that Na-jeong and Na-yeong have such similar names? It's really easy to mix them up, and as of yet I can't think of any thematic reason for it- these women have completely different temperaments. Maybe to a Korean ear it's a little less confusing...in any case, for the most part this episode just continues the basic themes of the last one, so there really isn't that much to analyze here. The ending remains elusive and difficult to predict, and it's not at all clear there's any satisfying way to resolve this new storyline development. The context of the full series will make it much easier to judge whether or not the recent episodes here have been successful.

Review by William Schwartz

"The Prime Minister and I" is directed by Lee So-yeon-I and written by Kim Eun-hee and Yoon Eun-kyeong and features Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon and Chae Jeong-an

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"The Prime Minister and I" Episode 14

The more vengeance related elements of the drama are starting to fizzle out. It really stinks for In-ho to have gone through all this trouble to try and set up this plan, only to find out now at the last minute that it was all for nothing. It's not that anything has actually happened to endanger the schemes or anything. There's just new information that's come up, pretty much out of nowhere, which calls the rationale of everything that's happened on the spy end of the plot into question.

Mind, there are still some unanswered questions. I can buy that Na-yeong survived the accident, but why was everyone so sure she was dead when the body was never found? How has she been getting along this whole time? Na-yeong has nice clothes and this episode states explicitly that she's been in the background all along. I'm not sure yet whether there's a substantive explanation behind this or if it's just a plot hole.

Kwon Yool and Da-jeong are, as usual, oblivious to everything that's going on. We continue on with the light cheery romantic antics from the previous episode- there's a bittersweet tinge to all this, given that we know Kwon Yool's wife is alive and that this is going to turn into a crisis soon. But Kwon Yool and Da-jeong come off more as serene than ignorant here.

It's the fundamental irony of this drama that holds a lot of the people. All this complicated political background stuff is going, all this wheeling and double-dealing sometimes even in the same building as our main couple. But Kwon Yool has chosen that he would rather do emotionally fulfilling stuff like play Go Stop with his father-in-law than devote every waking moment to trying to backstab all his enemies. Granted, from the very beginning Kwon Yool hasn't had a good eye for what his political opponents are doing- but he was always in that defensive posture ready to fight back. Now he's relaxing.

Da-jeong too seems to have lost interest in the more complicated intricacies of the plot. At the same time though, she is an intelligent analytical person. We're reminded at one point that at one point she used to be a reporter, and when Da-jeong figures out the big plot twist...well, this entire incident is more interesting from a motivation standpoint rather than a narrative one. The situation we're stuck with now is an awkward one. Difficult choices need to be made, and it remains to be seen whether Kwon Yool and Da-jeong will make the right ones. In any event, at least their hearts are in the right place.

Review by William Schwartz

"The Prime Minister and I" is directed by Lee So-yeon-I and written by Kim Eun-hee and Yoon Eun-kyeong and features Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon and Chae Jeong-an

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"The Prime Minister and I" Episode 13

Strangely, even though the last episode dealt with the aftermath of an assassination attempt, it's this episode that we actually see characters reacting with a genuine sense of alarm. Kwon Yool, rather than brushing off Da-Jeong's confession with the brusque casualness so often seen with emotionally closed off men in fiction, actually gives a serious considered response to her statement. And he puts a lot of thought into it too. The entire scene in the theater is a very rough one emotionally.

And yet, in spite of all this, well, it turns out the heart doesn't quite work that simply. Ugh, I can't believe I just typed that. Yes, "The Prime Minister and I" gets rather corny with the love stuff here. Matters aren't helped by the piano music, which is so deliberately tuned to amplify the melodrama of the situation it's practically eye-roll inducing. There's so much discussion of feelings here that it's just embarassing.

But you know what? I really don't mind. Yes it's undignified yes it's cheesy but sometimes love is actually like that. The privacy of these moments actually works really well for letting the sentiment of the situation really break through. "The Prime Minister and I" could have done any number of more outrageous publicity related reveals of this given the premise of the show, and it chose to go with something more mature. I have to respect it for that.

Granted, mature isn't exactly the word I'd use to describe the latest plot situation, which seems to come out of nowhere. Still, as a final plot twist, it's an effective one. Where Kwon Yool and Da-jeong highlight this episode by being completely emotionally honest about themselves, every other character has clearly been holding back secrets, scrambling to achieve whatever their convoluted long term goal is. Some of them are having regrets about this. Others take their plans to the next logical step.

All of this works to set up the mystery so well I'm honestly kind of doubtful whether the drama can deliver on the potential. It's difficult to imagine any explanation for the latest turn of events that doesn't sound horribly dumb and contrived. More horribly dumb and contrived than the premise of a sham political marriage that might now technically be bigamy at the same time it becomes a genuine relationship? Well, actually, maybe not. The writers have done a decent enough job shepherding this drama along so far so I'm willing to believe, for now, that there actually is a clever delivery and explanation for all this that effectively utilizes all the characterization we've gotten so far.

Review by William Schwartz

"The Prime Minister and I" is directed by Lee So-yeon-I and written by Kim Eun-hee and Yoon Eun-kyeong and features Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon and Chae Jeong-an

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"The Prime Minister and I" Episode 12

No, the cliffhanger from last time has not completely changed "The Prime Minister and I" into a medical drama where everyone spends their time at the hospital. There wasn't actually a lot of drama on that point even at the time, given that the previews clearly showed Kwon Yool up and walking about. The man's still a little sore from his injury, but for the most part he's able to go about his daily life unimpeded.

So, given all this, what was the point of the attack from a narrative perspective? As of yet it's not clear who attacked Kwon Yool or why. Nor do any of the characters seem to have any idea. There's an interesting clash between a couple of them over this very topic. When a person has been acting in a villainous enough way that someone else can seriously accuse them of being involved in an assassination attempt, that's a moment that really needs a reflective pause. Vengeance against Kwon Yool is starting to look, well, kind of mean and pointless actually.

The actual comedy in this drama is pretty decent on its own. There's a great bit of mistaken identity when some characters accidentally bully their way into the wrong hospital room. But if we actually manage to resolve the plot against Kwon Yool by just having the villains give up having realized they're being vindictive herks, now that will be an absurdist laugh. It would be all too appropriate given the lack of emphasis this drama has been placing on the revenge stuff lately.

This is in synergy with its strengths, though. Consider the scene where Kwon Yool tries to watch the news to get some idea why this guy came out of nowhere and stabbed him. Da-Jeong just walks straight up and turns the TV off. This stuff doesn't actually matter to Kwon Yool. It's not going to help him do his job or reassure his family if the man becomes obsessed with the plot against him- so why bother stressing about it?

At the very least "The Prime Minister and I" knows exactly what it was- a family drama about coming together with the politics stuff being used as a loose framing device. Da-Jeong meets significant milestones in this episode in terms of her role as wife and mother. And it only just now occurred to me that it's kind of politically incorrect to show these as her primary ambitions, but you know, who cares? She's good at this stuff. Why bother living life being miserable just as long as you're doing it correctly?

Review by William Schwartz

"The Prime Minister and I" is directed by Lee So-yeon-I and written by Kim Eun-hee and Yoon Eun-kyeong and features Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon and Chae Jeong-an

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"The Prime Minister and I" Episode 11

The political and romantic edges of the plot brush up against each other here, as we've barely even started out and Kwon Yool makes a statement that appears to be completely at odds with his serenade. I really like the sense of mystery Lee Beom-soo is able to pull off here. His actions are consistently inexplicable to Da-Jeong, to the point she can't really guess why his emotions keep turning around the way they do. Even we in the audience are a little befuddled until the flashback explanation comes up.

Excellent use of flashbacks here, by the way. Evidently Da-jeong has been doing lots of stuff in the Kwon household while we haven't been looking. The change in the kids' attitudes seems pretty extreme considering just a few episodes they regarded her with thinly veiled hostility. But then, remember, we're seeing things from Kwon Yool's point of view. He doesn't have any idea what's been going on, so we in the audience are seeing these new household innovations with the same sense of surprise that he is.

I like that, even after just 100 days, the influence Da-Jeong has had on the household can't be flippantly tossed aside. It's funny watching Kwon Yool trying to replicate all the little things and for the most part getting them wrong. While it's clear he thought through the personal emotional consequences of cutting Da-Jeong out, it's clear he still has trouble figuring out what his kids want.

Speaking of which, we finally get to see more of Yoo-Sik! Granted, he lives in a hospital for a reason, but I just really like the rapport the man has with every other character. I like that as long as he's playing Go-Stop...well, for the most part he's indistinguishable from any other grandpa. The guy's got a lot of charm, and I'd really like to see him take on a bigger role in this drama. That would require an expanding definition of family, though.

Which we might get to soon enough, given the cliffhanger. Admittedly, most of the surprise and the shock was ruined by its inclusion in the last episode's preview. Really clever there editing department. I'd completely forgotten about that bloody part until about halfway into this episode and then I was just impatiently waiting for it. As usual, "The Prime Minister and I" has a smattering of minor flaws. Luckily, they're forgivable ones in the context of a wider sweet story about familial affection with politics tossed in for extra drama.

Review by William Schwartz

"The Prime Minister and I" is directed by Lee So-yeon-I and written by Kim Eun-hee and Yoon Eun-kyeong and features Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon and Chae Jeong-an

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"The Prime Minister and I" Episode 10

Has it really been 100 days? I'm asking that literally- I don't really remember how this drama has been keeping track of time. At the beginning there was this kind of confusing thing where we started in the present, then flashed back two months earlier, then somewhere we must have gotten caught back up again but it's hard to tell where exactly. It's a problem with the tone of the storylines, which feel urgent and unresolved so it's hard to figure out an precise timeline.

Fortunately, this kind of stuff really isn't that relevant to appreciating "The Prime Minister and I" as a whole. The 100 days ceremony is less a concrete definable event as it is a benchmark in the relationship between Kwon Yool and Da-Jeong. Granted, the marriage is a sham- but Kwon Yool certainly must have some opinion about Da-Jeong by now, and the question naturally is what?

I like that Da-Jeong isn't really sure either. She goes through several different versions of what Kwon Yool might say in her imagination- all silly in their own way, while still being all too well-informed as to the kind of man Kwon Yool is. But the real thing manages to come out even better than that. There's a genuine sincerity in Kwon Yool's performance at the end that's palpable, even as the attentive viewer may note that he's using weasel words to avoid saying anything that could be seen as an expression of romantic love. Still, even the fact that he goes to that much trouble is significant.

The comedy is fairly solid throughout. The bar scene feels like a missed opportunity. I was kind of hoping for an actual fight to break out, but perhaps the wages of humor there aren't worth the absurdity necessary in order for the Prime Minister to get into a barfight without getting into big trouble over it. I could have at least done with that sneaky reporter salivating over the prospect though.

One of the odder developments of the story is that even though forces are clearly aligned to take Kwon Yool and Da-Jeong down, for the most part they're unaware of any threat because all the scheming and wheeling and dealing happens while they're not looking. Strangely, the supporting cast seems to play much better off of each other than they do with either of the two main leads. But it's a level of segregation I can appreciate. The tone does a good job of keeping the situation tense without making Kwon Yool and Da-Jeong look like idiots more interested in clowning around than facing the serious existential threat to their livelihood. Did you hear that "You Came From The Stars"?

Review by William Schwartz

"The Prime Minister and I" is directed by Lee So-yeon-I and written by Kim Eun-hee and Yoon Eun-kyeong and features Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon and Chae Jeong-an

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[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 9

[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 9

[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 9

Added episode 9 for the Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I'

Watch on DramaFever

"The Prime Minister and I" (2013)

Directed by Lee So-yeon-I

Written by Kim Eun-hee, Yoon Eun-kyeong

Network : KBS

With Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon, Chae Jeong-an, Ryoo Jin, Han Yeong-je,...

16 episodes - Mon, Tue 22:00

Also known as "The Prime Minister is Dating" ( , chong-li-wa yeon-ae-joong)

Synopsis

At 42-years-old, Kwon Yool (Lee Beom-soo) is South Korea's youngest prime minister ever. On top of his reputation of being an honest man of the utmost integrity, he's also a widower who raises his three children alone. But what the public doesn't know is that despite his perfect image, Prime Minister Kwon is actually a struggling father devoid of even the most basic of parenting skills. Nam Da Jung (Yoona) is a journalist who resorts to writing trashy tabloids to support her ailing father, but when she chases Prime Minister Kwon for a lucrative expos, she ends up scooping a whole lot more than she bargained for.

Broadcast starting date in Korea : 2013/12/09

[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 9Watch on DramaFever

Note : due to licensing, videos may not be available in your country

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[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 8

[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 8

[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 8

Added episode 8 for the Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I'

Watch on DramaFever

"The Prime Minister and I" (2013)

Directed by Lee So-yeon-I

Written by Kim Eun-hee, Yoon Eun-kyeong

Network : KBS

With Lee Beom-soo, Yoona, Yoon Si-yoon, Chae Jeong-an, Ryoo Jin, Han Yeong-je,...

16 episodes - Mon, Tue 22:00

Also known as "The Prime Minister is Dating" ( , chong-li-wa yeon-ae-joong)

Synopsis

At 42-years-old, Kwon Yool (Lee Beom-soo) is South Korea's youngest prime minister ever. On top of his reputation of being an honest man of the utmost integrity, he's also a widower who raises his three children alone. But what the public doesn't know is that despite his perfect image, Prime Minister Kwon is actually a struggling father devoid of even the most basic of parenting skills. Nam Da Jung (Yoona) is a journalist who resorts to writing trashy tabloids to support her ailing father, but when she chases Prime Minister Kwon for a lucrative expos, she ends up scooping a whole lot more than she bargained for.

Broadcast starting date in Korea : 2013/12/09

[Video] Added Korean drama 'The Prime Minister and I' episode 8Watch on DramaFever

Note : due to licensing, videos may not be available in your country

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"Prime Minister and I" Extended with One More Episode

"Prime Minister and I" Extended with One More Episode

Prime Minister and I Extended with One More EpisodeKBS2s Monday-Tuesday drama Prime Minister and I has been extended with one final episode.

According to an announcement made on December 30, one extra episode of the drama will be produced, making it consist of 17 episodes. The drama will be cancelled on December 31 due to the KBS Drama Awards held at the same time, and instead of ending the drama on Monday and leaving the Tuesday time slot empty, the producers decided to extend it with one more episode. 

The final episode will air on February 4 instead of the original date January 28, and as a result, the follow-up drama Full Sun will air its pilot episode on February 10. Full Sun has recently made the headlines by revealing that actor Yoon Kye Sang is in talks for the melodrama, but very little information of the drama has been unveiled so far.

Prime Minister and I depicts the unusual romance between prime minister Kwon Yool (Lee Bum Soo) and reporter Nam Da Jung (YoonA) and airs every Monday and Tuesday.

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